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How hard is it to get accepted?

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Category: Nova Southeastern University AA Program
Forum Name: Nova AA Students
Forum Discription: Nova AA student discussion forum
URL: http://www.AnesthesiologistAssistant.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=63
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Topic: How hard is it to get accepted?
Posted By: yohndavid
Subject: How hard is it to get accepted?
Date Posted: 08 Mar 2009 at 11:11pm
fjrigjwwe9r0tblThread:Message
Hello, I am a high school senior / college freshman interested in learning more about the A.A. program at NOVA and in the details of the career path itself...

For those of you aspiring to get accepted or  have already been accepted, what kind of grades did you have in high school /  college? What was your major? I am thinking about majoring in biology but am a little bit wary as I have seen a lot of people with MA degrees and research experience applying for admission to this program... Just how competitive is it?

I plan on getting my Associates degree at LSCC and transferring to wherever seems best when the times comes. How likely are you of landing a job with a Biology degree where you would be getting relevant work experience to being an A.A.? Should I be volunteering now to become familiar with the hospital setting?

I also understand that the program requires MCAT scores and what not for admission... I have not researched the difficulty of this test or what scores the school would like to see in *potential* applicants, and what they are likely to accept.

Thanks in advance for feedback!


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carpe diem



Replies:
Posted By: AA dude
Date Posted: 01 Jun 2009 at 12:48am
fjrigjwwe9r0tblThread:Message
High school grades are worthless.  No one will ever see them.  I had a 3.6 GPA in college. 
You don't need the MCAT, you can also do the GRE (it's easier). 

Major in whatever you want, it makes no difference.  Just get good grades, whatever you do.  You don't need to work in the field beforehand.  If you wanted to you could become a surgical tech, anesthesia tech, respiratory therapist, or EMT.  All of these would require specific training though.  Some of these might be associates degrees (I can't remember) so you could do them and then get a bio degree all in four years I suppose.  Again it's not necessary to do any of that although it could make your application stonger.

It keeps getting more competitive every year so by the time you would be applying, who knows what the quality of the candidates will be.  My suggestion would be to get your bachelor's and apply as soon as you can with just shadowing/volunteering experience.  If you don't get in at first, then go to school for one of the four professions I mentioned (or do it as an associate's degree beforehand if that's possible).


Posted By: sinohack
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2010 at 7:00pm
fjrigjwwe9r0tblThread:Message
I graduated from college 10 years ago with a BS in Biology and BA in Chemistry. I had originally wanted to apply to medical school. However, I had an opportunity to be involved in a business, and then a few months became a decade. After the current financial crisis, I decided to come back to the health care field and stumbled upon AA.
 
I have a 3.8 gpa and got 1410, 5 on my GRE, but no healthcare experience. Will this kill my chances of getting in an AA school? Should I consider getting a job in the field first? I've already wasted enough time and don't know if I can continue starting different careers.
 
Advice is greatly appreciated.


Posted By: cdboynt
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2010 at 12:35pm
fjrigjwwe9r0tblThread:Message
@sinohack

Well, the first issue is graduation over 10 years ago. Most of the AA schools require graduation within the past 6 years. You might want to brush up on a course or two before applying. No worries on working in the health field. They only require a shadowing experience, but volunteering at a local hospital would definitely increase your chances.

Be positive. You can always start a different career. That is the point of higher education. Don't beat yourself up so much. I'm almost 30 and just starting to explore the medical field. BTW, great job on the GRE scores. If you can brush up on your courses and get a more recent GRE, you should be golden.

Hope that helps! Good luck!



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